aterrier

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Posts Tagged ‘Bull Terrier

Bark Jacobs

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From the Bark Jacobs dog line

Marc Jacobs is the most influential creative voice in luxury fashion today. As creative director of Louis Vuitton, the world’s largest luxury goods company, Jacobs oversees the studio that in the last decade has produced sumptuous and witty versions of the classic Vuitton monogram handbag – like the denim jacquard one trimmed in chincilla – that have sold by the millions. Yet Jacobs sees what he does at Vuitton as the antithesis of luxury today. “The way I define luxury isn’t by fabric or riber or the amount of gold bits hanging from it,” Jacobs says, sitting in his Paris office, sucking on his umpteenth cigarette of the day as his bull terrier Alfred gnaws on a soup bone. “That’s an old definition. For me, luxury is about pleasing yourself, not dressing for other people.”

Dana Thomas. Deluxe.

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August 2, 2008 at 7:21 am

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Bullseye

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Bullseye is a Bull Terrier and trademark of the Target Brands, a subsidiary of Target Corporation. It has a pure white coat, and has Target Corporation’s bullseye logo painted around its left eye. It is featured in Target’s commercial campaigns and in store sale signing and is used in various marketing campaigns. Target also offers the dog as a stuffed toy for special events or employee recognition.The TV campaign by Rhythm & Hues Studios was launched in July 2005. Its commercials feature modernized versions of Busby Berkley inspired choreography with hip hop music. In an article published in August 2005 on Rhythm & Hues Studio Website, the Executive Producer, Amy Hassler, gave her comments on working on this project:

“The Target ads are fresh and hip so we were thrilled to be a part of this campaign,” says Amy Hassler. “It was a creative convergence for our studio on a variety of levels: it showcased our art direction and seamless Flame compositing capabilities and gave us the opportunity to create a CGI version of the iconic Target dog.”

Also collaborating on this winning ad project was the six-time MTV Award winner Eric DeHaven. In the same article mentioned above, DeHaven commented, “The Target job was an exciting opportunity to work with a new client whose work I respect immensely; We had a high standard to live up to.” DeHaven was around for the entire project from dreaming it up to wrapping it up.

This ad campaign was no easy task and the Target Dog only helped. It is highly trained and did most everything the trainers and design collaborators wanted it to do. This was especially helpful during the 360-degree test shots the crew did while rendering the dog to create it in CGI.

Wikipedia

Bullseye and Rosie Perez. Getty Images

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July 28, 2008 at 1:38 am

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Booth’s bull terrier

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No matter how expressive his cats, the hands-down favorite is a sour-looking pointy-eared dog. Its creator is clueless as to why the dog, who adorns souvenir T-shirts sold by The New Yorker, is so popular. “I don’t try to analyze humor,” he said. “You go nowhere doing that. A thing is funny or it’s not funny.”As for the famous dog icon, “I started drawing what I thought was an awful-looking dog,” he recalled. After receiving a letter from a fan asking whether the canine was an English bull terrier, “I went to the library, improved his breeding, and made him an English bull terrier.”

Once Mr. Booth starts drawing dogs and cats, he has a hard time stopping. His record for a single cartoon is 86 cats and 74 dogs. Each portrait is individualized, a tour de force of cartoon art conveying personality and mood through skilled line drawing. “From a business perspective, it doesn’t make sense to draw 86 cats and 74 dogs,” he acknowledged, because he is paid by the work, and not the hour, “but I enjoy it.”

Several years ago Mr. Booth was asked to draw his trademark terrier as a gift. “I never do what I’m told,” Mr. Booth recounted. So he drew a “diseased chicken.” Only then did he learn the picture was for President Ronald Reagan. “Mr. Reagan was very gracious,” Mr. Booth said of meeting Mr. Reagan in the Oval Office, “and he never had me shot — to date.”

“Nothing intimidates George,” Mr. Lorenz recalled of the encounter. “He’s willing to try anything once.”

 New York Times. 1993

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July 22, 2008 at 3:31 am

Bull’s Eye from Oliver Twist

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Bill Sikes’s dog, Bull’s-eye, has “faults of temper in common with his owner” and is an emblem of his owner’s character. The dog’s viciousness represents Sikes’s animal-like brutality, while Sikes’s self-destructiveness is evident in the dog’s many scars. The dog, with its willingness to harm anyone on Sikes’ whim, shows the mindless brutality of the master. Sikes himself senses that the dog is a reflection of himself and that is why he tries to drown the dog. He is really trying to run away from who he is. This is also illustrated when Sikes dies and the dog does immediately also.[15] After Sikes murders Nancy, Bull’s-eye also comes to represent Sikes’s guilt. The dog leaves bloody footprints on the floor of the room where the murder is committed. Not long after, Sikes becomes desperate to get rid of the dog, convinced that the dog’s presence will give him away. Yet, just as Sikes cannot shake off his guilt, he cannot shake off Bull’s-eye, who arrives at the house of Sikes’s demise before Sikes himself does. Bull’s-eye’s name also conjures up the image of Nancy’s eyes, which haunts Sikes until the bitter end and eventually causes him to hang himself accidentally.
From Wikipedia

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June 23, 2008 at 11:26 am

Frankenweenie

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Victor Frankenstein (played by Barret Oliver) is a young boy who creates movies starring his dog, Sparky (a bull terrier). After Sparky is hit by a car, Victor learns at school about electrical impulses in muscles, and gets the idea to bring his pet back to life. He creates elaborate machines which bring down a bolt of lightning that revives the dog. While Victor is pleased, his neighbors are terrified by the animal, and when the Frankensteins decide to introduce the revitalized Sparky to them, they become angry and afraid. Sparky runs away, with Victor in pursuit, and they find themselves at a local miniature golf course, and hide in its flagship windmill. The Frankensteins’ neighbors, now an angry mob, arrive on the scene, and while using a cigarette lighter to try to see in, the windmill is accidentally lit on fire. Victor falls and is knocked out, but Sparky rescues him from the flames, in time to be crushed by the windmill. The mob realizes its error, and use their cars, along with jumper cables, to “recharge” Sparky. He is revived, and all celebrate. Sparky later falls in love with a poodle with a hairstyle strangely resembling the Bride of Frankenstein’s.
Wikipedia 

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June 16, 2008 at 12:44 pm

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Marc Jacobs: art and business

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Marc Jacobs and his bull terriers

And at the time it was a very different set of circumstances here at Vuitton. I basically broke the rules. I was told point-blank that I couldn’t change the canvas or do anything to it. And I got fed up with doing what I thought would please the head of communications. I got tired of playing by the rules. And I thought, The only time I’ve ever made a difference, and the only time anything ever changes, is really when you’re respectful and disrespectful at the same time. Just as I’d been fired for the grunge collection I did at Perry Ellis, I thought, Whoa, you know, this is what I think we should be doing, and we’re going to send it out anyway . . .
There was a different president here at Vuitton, and a different head of communications. But the press responded so well, and there was such fervor for these bags. They were knocked off immediately. So I forced the company into getting behind something that they didn’t want me to do in the beginning. It was the public that really said, “This is what we wanna see. This is what makes an old thing that our mothers and grandmothers and grandfathers and great-grandparents carried into something that we actually want now.” And so, there was a lesson in this for me. Not that I really needed to learn it, because it was doing what I instinctively wanted to do.

Interview Magazine. June 2008. Marc Jacobs talks to Glenn O’Brien

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June 11, 2008 at 10:53 am

Spuds “Aibo” McKenzie

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May 17, 2008 at 8:37 am

Posted in Bull Terrier

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